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14th Jul 2013
2013 FGP Garden Tour: Sunday 7/14, 10:00am-4:00pm

Looking for landscaping and design ideas for your very own urban oasis? Want to see how a Koi pond works? Ever thought about growing your own vegetables? How about keeping bees in your own backyard?

If you answered ‘YES!’ to any of these questions, then this year’s Friends of Goodale Park Garden Tour is for YOU!

Enjoy a day filled with beautiful gardens and thought-provoking presentations, all centered around living the good life in the city.

This year’s tour will feature a wide variety of gardens in the neighborhoods surrounding Goodale Park, and will also offer a behind-the-scenes look at how one of the Short North’s newest food experiences, Till dynamic fare, takes urban gardening to a new level.

We are also very excited to welcome some amazing folks to the Goodale Park Caretaker’s Residence this year for presentations on earth-to-table gardening, beekeeping, and more! Please see the tour schedule (below) for details on garden tour stops and presentation times.

As always, the Friends of Goodale Park Garden Tour is FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

 

2013 FGP GARDEN TOUR SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

10:00am-11:00am: “Backyard Food Production Basics”, presentation by Local Matters Development Manager/Guru Adam Fazio. Location: Caretaker’s Residence, Goodale Park.

11:00am-12:00pm: “Biodynamic Agriculture”, presentation by Magdiale Wolmark of Till dynamic fare. Location: Caretaker’s Residence, Goodale Park.

12:00pm-4:00pm: Neighborhood Gardens open to the public. Full tour lineup below.

2:00pm-3:00pm: “Beekeeping Basics”, presentation by Scioto Valley Beekeepers Association/Beekeeping School Instructor David Crawford. Location: Caretaker’s Residence, Goodale Park.

3:00pm-4:00pm: Presentation TBA

TOUR LINEUP

  • 754 NEIL AVENUE: The garden related to this Neo Jacobian structure built in 1891 and home and office for Landscape Architects Deborah and John Edsall, emphasizes the organization of exterior spaces. The garden design utilizes fencing along with hardscape and softscape materials appropriate for the late 1800’s. The site development is treated in the front in a formal manner, eliminating all lawn areas by incorporating evergreen textures, ornamental grasses and colorful perennials. The rear yard was designed in a less formal manner with a raised veranda, pavers, a small lawn area and plantings. A custom designed arched trellis covered with ivy duplicates the cut glass windows and serves as an effective screen. The  southern half of the yard has been designated for a garden railroad, Victorian Station. The garden railroad, its buildings, its trains and people replicate the Victorian era with the B & O and Pennsylvania railroad common to Ohio.
  • 762 NEIL AVENUE: This spectacular Victorian home, built in 1890, has a secret. Its front garden, on busy Neil Avenue, boasts a formal appearance, alive with color but fully in tune with the sounds and busy activity of the surrounding neighborhood. Along the rudbeckia- and Russian sage-lined walk to the rear garden, however, the visitor senses a change. A quiet, peaceful refuge awaits. The homeowners enjoy a serene getaway from the noise of nearby summer festivals and parties. The dining deck overlooks a winding path through a mixture of potted plants and interesting foliage, and a gurgling pond that has housed the same family of goldfish for the past three years. It’s a true urban oasis!
  • 365 WEST FIRST AVENUE: Joel Knepp and Lynda McClanahan grow as much food as possible in an urban setting.  Look for an orchard of heirloom fruit trees, a grape arbor, six raised beds and an outdoor pavilion from which to enjoy it all. A vintage travel trailer and a private, bricked-in back yard rim the south side of the property. Lynda is an award-winning artist whose work will also be on display on the tour.
  • 351 WEST FOURTH AVENUE: As these homeowners aged, their gardening strategy became simplicity, accessibility, and manageability. The front yard and alley are filled with easy care plants like an oakleaf hydrangea, hostas, day lilies, lilliropes, and European ginger. The back yard is enclosed in walls of akebia, climbing hydrangea, and porcelain vines with hostas, ferns, and zinnias in pots and small beds. The “secret garden” lies behind the garage with two raised bed gardens for herbs and tomatoes, and one for cut flowers. Throughout the yard, the owners have displayed some of the art they enjoy.
  • WEST FOURTH GROUP (315, 328, 331 & 340 West Fourth): The West Fourth Group offers four gardens featuring seed-grown annuals.
    • 315:  Country garden theme features ornamental corn, rudbeckia, celosia, zinnias and dahlias. On the porch thunbergia climb to meet hanging tomatoes.
    • 328:  Sun to shade garden welcomes all with ‘Uproar Rose’ zinnias accented with Zahara zinnias and ornamental peppers. Hanging and column baskets feature ‘Sophistica’ petunias framing the shade garden anchored with ligularia, hostas and astilbe.
    • 331:  Hanging ‘Illumination’ begonias highlight the front garden of petunias, zinnias, salvia, and a hedge of impatiens. The rear shade garden features a wall of flowers around potted tuberous begonias tucked among hostas, ferns and heuchera.
    • 340:  Partial shade front garden features three newer begonias – ‘Big’, ‘Ikon’ and ‘Fairyland’ – planted with ‘Kong’ coleus and polka-dot plant. Giant amaranthus anchor the front porch featuring baskets of double and ‘Wave’ petunias.
  • TILL DYNAMIC FARE, 247 KING AVENUE: TILL dynamic fare, one of the city’s most widely-acclaimed eateries, has continuously operated a classic jardin potager, or kitchen garden, behind the restaurant for eight years.  The garden was designed by landscape architect Jennifer Bartley and is featured in her first book “Designing the New Kitchen Garden, An American Potager Handbook.” Two years ago, TILL’s owner and chef Magdiale Woolmark incorporated the biodynamic method into his gardening techniques which he studied at the Pfeiffer Center, one of the country’s premier biodynamic training facilities.

 

VOLUNTEERS are needed to assist with this year’s FGP Garden Tour. For details, please contact Julie Hallan, Volunteer Coordinator, at 614-887-PARK (7275), or email volunteercoordinator@goodalepark.org.

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